Stephen Jack Fine Art

Diana Armstrong

Art For Sale

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Artist: Diana Armstrong; Painting: Feathering the Nest Diana Armstrong

Feathering the Nest

Oil with gold and silver leaf on linen, signed.
39 x 85 cm

 
Artist: Diana Armstrong; Painting: Swallows Return Diana Armstrong

Swallows Return

Oil with gold and silver leaf on linen, signed.
61 x 61 cm

SOLD

 
Artist: Diana Armstrong; Painting: Drink Me Diana Armstrong

Drink Me

Oil on linen mounted on panel
21 x 26 cm

SOLD


 

Diana Armstrong has developed a unique approach to her art, which she styles as "Magical Realism", drawing much of her inspiration from literary sources. Her methods and technique are based on skilled draughtsmanship and handling of oil paint and the underlying narrative in her work follows in the tradition of the earlier Masters.

We first discovered Diana's work when we exhibited a series of animal themed works in 2014. Since then her career has blossomed, winning an award for her painting at the "New Lights" Art Competition. Then, from relative obscurity having never exhibited her work publicly, her paintings have appeared in exhibitions at the Mall Galleries and Hay Hill Galleries in London as well as 2 London art fairs, with her works selling to collectors in the UK and overseas.

 
Artist: Diana Armstrong; Painting: Time's Arrow Diana Armstrong

Time's Arrow

Oil on linen mounted on panel
30 x 40 cm

  
Artist: Diana Armstrong; Painting: The Dance Diana Armstrong

The Dance

Oil and silver leaf on linen

SOLD

   
Artist: Diana Armstrong; Painting: Autumn's Crown Diana Armstrong

Autumn's Crown

Oil and silver leaf on linen, signed.
61 x 76 cm

  

Diana Armstrong was born in 1980 and was brought up in rural North Yorkshire. She graduated with a degree in English Language and Literature from King's College London in 2004. It was here that she was inspired by art from the Middle Ages to the Modern period, especially during a course run by her tutor Max Saunders comparing literature with art. She continued to visit galleries frequently, often copying from the great masters in the National Gallery, Tate Britain and Courtauld Institute. In a search to find a genre that best describes her work, she has chosen the term 'Magical Realism' which concerns itself with broken boundaries between the mythical and the real.